Ptosis

Eyelid ptosis or blepharoptosis is the drooping of the upper eyelid. It can affect one or both eyes. This condition can be treated at any age. Nobody has to live with this problem. Surgery can be done under local or general anesthesia and takes less than 30 minutes. Recovery takes between 2 and 3 weeks.

What you should know about Ptosis

In children, the most common cause of ptosis is poor development of the muscle that lifts the upper eyelid (levator muscle).

In adults, with aging, the tendon that connects the levator muscle to the eyelid stretches and the eyelid falls covering part of the eye. Ptosis can also be caused by disease or injury to the nerve or the levator muscle.

There are three ways to correct a droopy eyelid, depending on the type and severity.

  1. Ptosis surgery usually involves tightening the levator muscle through a small incision in the eyelid crease to elevate the eyelid to the desired position.
  2. For mild ptosis in adults, a procedure called MMCR (Müller Muscle Conjunctiva Resection) can be done through the inside of the upper eyelid without skin incision.
  3. For severe ptosis with poor function of the levator muscle, a sling (suspension band) is placed from the brow to the upper eyelid to couple brow movement with eyelid opening (Frontalis Suspension).

The result of ptosis surgery is both functional and cosmetic. Normal vision field and symmetry with the opposite upper eyelid is obtained.

Ptosis surgery

Surgery in adults is usually performed under local anesthesia. General anesthesia may be used, especially with younger children. The patient goes home the same day.

Recovery from Ptosis surgery

Minor bruising or swelling can be expected for a couple of weeks. Stitches are removed 10 days later. It will be necessary to put eye drops every hour during the day for the first week, and 6 times a day afterwards until the swelling is completely gone.